Global Language and Culture Conference:
Inspiring the Novice Language Learner

Presented by
Professional Programs at Punahou and Wo International Center in collaboration with The Dalton School

The 9th annual Global Language and Culture Conference is open to all teachers of world and classical languages grades K – 12. The conference features a keynote speaker, networking sessions and a series of workshops on a variety of topics of interest to all language teachers. Come to learn new techniques and methods, explore best practices in language teaching, establish connections with colleagues and strengthen your Personal Learning Network.

June 28 — June 30, 2022
Punahou School
Honolulu, Hawai‘i
Includes materials, breakfast and lunch for three days

Registration deadline has passed.

Schedule

Please select a date to view that specific day’s schedule.

June 28, 2022

June 29, 2022

June 30, 2022

9 – 9:30 a.m.
Welcome

9:30 – 10:30 a.m.
Keynote

Inspiring the Novice Language Learner: Head, Heart, and Hand
How can we be accountable to our novice language learners? How can we engage them with what they need to achieve success? How we can provide instruction that is deep and rich and how can we engage cognitive, affective, and psychomotor dimensions so that we inform learners’ minds, move their hearts and provide action for their hands? This session will outline the crucial elements for language learning with a focus on the novice level.

10:30 – 11:30 a.m.
Networking

11 – Noon
Lunch

12:15 – 1:15 p.m.
Session #1

Option A

The Power of Thematic Teaching
Why is it so important to organize our teaching thematically with integrated thematic units? How can we create curriculum that will engage and motivate our students? Thematic planning can free the language teacher from the limitations of existing materials and lead to lessons that are more cognitively and emotionally engaging. In this session we will examine the elements of an effective thematic unit and share a basic adaptable template.

Helena Curtain, author/consultant, Milwaukee, WI
helenacurtain@gmail.com

Option B

Integrating Polynesian culture into the French curriculum
Often forgotten from textbooks, the vibrant culture of French Polynesia offers a wonderful window for students to explore the diversity of Francophone cultures. This presentation will showcase several resources, texts and activities used to integrate the Polynesian voice into the French curriculum and to help students build cultural competency. Most of these activities were designed for higher level classes, but not all.

Veronique Brau, US French Teacher, Lakeside School, Seattle, WA
Veronique.Brau@lakesideschool.org

1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Session #2

Option A

Utilizing Centers in the preK-8 World Language Classroom
Want to immerse your students in engaging proficiency-based activities in the target language? In this workshop you will learn how to effectively use centers in the language classroom to promote language-learning independence, student choice, and organic language fun. We will share interactive games, literacy strategies, Bitmoji classrooms, and applicable technology in order to help you successfully set up centers in your classroom based on the modes of communication. Virtual options will also be provided for those days when you have to go online or go asynchronous.

Betsy Basom, Spanish Teacher Grades 3-6, Village School, Pacific Palisades, CA
bbasom@village-school.org

Option B

High Leverage Teaching Practices in the WL Classroom
The High Leverage Teaching Practices from ACTFL are research-based practices that have been shown to be effective for language teaching. These practices include Facilitating TL Comprehensibility, Building a Classroom Discourse Community, Guiding Learners to Interpret and Discuss Authentic Texts, Focusing on Form in a Dialogic Context Through PACE, Focusing on Cultural Products, Practices, and Perspectives in a Dialogic Context, and Providing Oral Corrective Feedback to Improve Learner Performance. We will explore these practices and how they might be implemented in the novice level language classroom.

Lori Langer de Ramirez, Director-World and Classical Language Department, The Dalton School, NYC
lramirez@dalton.org

9 – 10 a.m.
Session #3

Option A

Boosting Students’ Language Performance Using Teacher And Peer Feedback
In addition to CI and IPA assessments, how do we strengthen our students’ language performance? Feedback. Whether by teachers or students, constructive feedback can provide a shortcut for language learners in the process of trial and error. Consistent, informational, and encouraging feedback given during formative assessments can help students correct their errors before summative assessments. After summative assessments, a general review of students’ strengths and weaknesses can show them a big picture of what they have achieved and how they can improve moving forward. In this workshop, we will talk about several entry points to give feedback, how teachers and students give feedback, and what constructive feedback looks like.

Cindy Wu, MS/HS Mandarin Teacher, The Dalton School, NYC
cwu@dalton.org

Option B

Valuing Culture and Diversity in the Spanish Classroom
This presentation is designed to give educators practical examples to fully engage Spanish language classrooms through cultural experiences. Educators will receive resources to help amplify the voices of some marginalized cultures and to motivate students to continue to learn language and culture. In this session, the presenter will share strategies to include culture marginalized indigenous and Afro-descendant voices in the language classroom. Participants will leave with a repertoire of low-to-no-prep tools that they could use in their classes the very next day.

Rosa Bell, MS/HS Spanish Teacher, James Campbell HS, HI and 2021 HALT Teacher of the Year
rosa.bell@campbell.k12.hi.us

10:15 – 11:15 a.m.
Session #4

Option A

IPAs in the World Language Classroom
An exploration of Integrated Performance Assessments, a model for assessing proficiency through the interpretation of authentic resources (interpretive listening or reading), combined with interpersonal speaking tasks, and real-world presentational speaking or writing tasks. Examples for novice level students will be shared.

Lori Langer de Ramirez, Director-World and Classical Language Department, The Dalton School, NYC
lramirez@dalton.org

Option B

Best Practices in Designing and Curating Your LMS
This session will be more of a discussion than a presentation and follow an idea share format. The goal of this session will be to discuss and share ideas regarding best practices in designing an engaging and helpful web page for our language learners, especially at the beginning levels. We will discuss page layout, helpful resources, interactive tools, sample assignments and activities and any other features from your LMS that you have found valuable in your teaching. Come ready to share one of your classes’ websites or just come to get inspiration and support to start building one. All levels of comfort with technology are welcome.

Veronique Brau, Upper School French Teacher, Lakeside School, Seattle, WA
Veronique.Brau@lakesideschool.org

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Lunch

12:45 – 1:45 a.m.
Session #5

Option A

The NNELL Networking Session
The NNELL Networking Session is an opportunity for early language educators, PreK - 8, to meet for an open discussion to swap ideas and professionally connect with early childhood, elementary, and middle school world language educators from around the country. This will be run in an “un-conference” style session to foster ideas, conversation and most importantly engagement between attendees. Need some ideas? Need to vent? Need some guidance? Come chat with us!

Betsy Basom, Spanish Teacher Grades 3-6, Village School, Pacific Palisades, CA
bbasom@village-school.org

Option B

Maximizing the Potential of Our Language Activities
How can we utilize activities that build an affective connection with learners? What does it take to make an activity, at the least, intrinsically interesting? We will examine strategies that are always intrinsically interesting, but that also incorporate elements that are cognitively engaging and culturally connected. Among the varied possibilities, we will examine examples of engaging strategies Involving the importance of context, play, and story form and more.

Helena Curtain, author/consultant, Milwaukee, WI
helenacurtain@gmail.com

2 – 2:30 p.m.
Networking

9 – 10 a.m.
Session #6

Option A

The Happy Capybara – a Thematic Unit for Novice Spanish Students
With the recent release of the film Encanto, the capybara has made a resurgence and gained in popularity among children and adolescents (as well as adults!) Teachers can leverage the fascination students have with the capybara and use that interest to design tasks, lessons, and a complete thematic unit that is both compelling and fun. In this model unit students reinforce novice-level vocabulary around themes like las actividades, la comida, la ropa, and los animales through interpretive reading and viewing activities, presentational speaking and writing, and interpersonal speaking activities. They will also explore cultural products and practices relating to the capybara and debate a variety of cultural perspectives relating to humans' interactions with the animal.

Lori Langer de Ramirez, Director-World and Classical Language Department, The Dalton School, NYC, lramirez@dalton.org

Option B

Applied Theater and El Coqui
This interactive presentation focuses on the use of Applied Theatre techniques to teach Spanish through the specific cultural lenses of el coqui. Applied Theatre encompasses several forms of participatory theater that is used to educate, promote dialogue and critical thinking. Among those forms are Theatre in Education (TIE) and Drama in Education (DIE). The aim of this workshop is to provide an experience generated by a case study with second graders where the students play theater games, engage in drama conventions and activities in the target language. Through these tasks participants explore a specific thematic unit using the coqui as a guide and cultural inspiration. The coqui is a little frog from Puerto Rico who only speaks Spanish and can only have a voice through its particular and unique sound, and through the participants’ voices, creativity and excitement to learn about the world.

Nivia Marrero, Spanish Teacher Grade 2, The Dalton School, NYC
nmarrero@dalton.org

10:15 – 11:15 a.m.
Session #7

Option A

The Art of Reading
Thinking about the aesthetic aspects of your teaching can open new ways of engaging your students and the stories that you teach. Certainly, students who can visualize, dramatize, and engage with the content they are reading will feel more connected. Come join us as we explore interactive, aesthetic approaches that enhance the learning experience of your students. Participants will step into the world of their students as the presenter shares resources that can be immediately replicated in daily classes. Each attendee will have the chance to work collaboratively to create a number of new strategies into their everyday pedagogy, including but not limited to ways of developing a more standards-based/performance-based assessment scheme. Rooted in the philosophies and practices of Maxine Greene, Stephen Krashen, Thomas Guskey, and Frank Smith, participants will explore the practical and aesthetic underpinnings of multi-representational approaches to texts–whether they be stories, film clips, maps, inscriptions, or other works of art.

Sammie Smith, MS/HSLatin Teacher, The Dalton School, NYC
ssmith@dalton.org

Option B

Teaching with Comprehensible Input
TCI (Teaching with Comprehensible Input) is a powerful and effective approach for novice learners in language acquisition. The TCI instruction is based on the fundamentals of second language acquisition theory, with the two main channels of acquisition of Listening and Reading. In this Mandarin class demonstration, I would like to use various TCI strategies to initiate acquisition via listening and learn how to naturally scaffold the knowledge into reading. The purpose of this class demonstration is to guide the audience through the 3 main steps in the TPRS framework model: Establish Meaning, Provide Auditory Input, and Provide Reading Input. The presentation can be utilized for all languages; however, we will use Mandarin as an example to engage the audience in this methodology demonstration. Practical strategies and activities will be provided under each step.

Ruth Chou, Grade 3-8 Mandarin teacher, Marin Country Day School, CA.
whom_ever@yahoo.com

11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
Lunch

12:45 – 1:45 p.m.
Session #8

 

The Power of Information Gap Activities in the Novice Level Classroom
Information gap activities provide a reason and a meaningful context for learners to speak with each other and are a powerful tool in developing language proficiency. Such activities involve learners in multiple opportunities to use the target language in meaningful, scaffolded exchanges. Participants will learn how to develop and implement a variety of partner and small-group interactive information gap tasks that facilitate language growth.

Helena Curtain, author/consultant, Milwaukee, WI
helenacurtain@gmail.com

2 – 2:30 p.m.
Closing