Punahou Connects with Worldwide Voyage in New York

Camila Chaudron ’08

May 29, 2015

Leaders from the Polynesian Voyaging Society and the Worldwide Voyage recently convened in New York City to prepare for Hōkūle‘a’s arrival in June of 2016, and Punahou educators and alumni were well-represented among the supporters. Malia Ane ’72, the School’s K – 12 director of Hawaiian studies, represented Punahou at the Worldwide Voyage Educator Institute at New York University, and many Punahou alumni joined the planning and fundraising efforts.

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Many Punahou alumni gathered to celebrate the mission of the Worldwide Voyage in New York City this May.

At the Educator Institute, Ane presented the many ways that Punahou is connecting to the Worldwide Voyage – from classroom video chats with crew members on Hōkūle‘a and its sister vessel, Hikianalia, to the Mālama Kumu trips in countries along the path of the voyage. She also brought curricular materials to share with fellow teachers at the workshop.

“It’s important to establish relationships before the canoes arrive in New York,” Ane explained. “It will make Hōkūle‘a’s arrival more meaningful to both communities.” Following the Educator Institute, a fundraiser was held to support the Worldwide Voyage, and a planning meeting was convened to coordinate the welcoming ceremonies.

For Ane, the connections made with educators and alumni in New York are part of the value of the Worldwide Voyage, and they also served as a powerful reminder for the importance of place-based learning in the curriculum.

“Part of Punahou’s goal within the context of the Worldwide Voyage is to understand different cultures and their different dynamics,” Ane explained. “Our kumu and haumana are grounded in Hawai‘i, and the history of this place. It’s important to be a global thinker within the context of the local culture.”

For many Punahou alumni participating in the planning and coordination of Hōkūle‘a’s arrival in New York, the Worldwide Voyage has provided another platform for building connections.

“The preparation for the arrival of Hōkūle‘a in New York is a wonderful example of the Punahou ‘ohana in action,” said Leslie Morioka ’64, who is spearheading these efforts on behalf of Hālāwai, a nonprofit whose mission is to perpetuate the heritage, culture, history and future of Hawai‘i and other Pacific islands.

“There is much to do to educate the greater New York area about the Worldwide Voyage, its mission and its values,” Morioka said. “We in New York are very excited that Hōkūle‘a is coming and want to make it as historic as possible. The fact that Punahou’s 175th anniversary is the same year as the arrival of Hōkūle‘a in New York makes it that much more momentous.”

If you’re in New York and would like to get involved in the preparations for the Worldwide Voyage, email Hālāwai at aloha@halawai.org.

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