Art

The Visual Art curriculum extends beyond skills, techniques and concepts. We provide environments that promote purposeful exploration towards the creation of visual expressions. Our goal is to have students develop the habits of mind and practice that allow them to become curious, confident, resilient individuals devoted to creating value in the world and in the lives of the people around them.

Graduation Requirements

Students need to earn two credits in the Visual and Performing Arts. All courses taken to fulfill the Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement must be taken for a grade. Courses taken for general elective credit may earn either a grade or Credit/No Credit. 

Course Offerings

Drawing I

Drawing I is an introductory course which focuses on developing skills through the exploration of various drawing materials such as graphite, charcoal, ink, pastel, watercolor and mixed media. This course emphasizes process and innovation. Students learn to develop basic skills and use a variety of media with an emphasis on process and creativity. Drawing is a fundamental activity in the visual arts, which involves critical thinking, learning to ask questions and making judgments.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No Prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Drawing II

Drawing II is a natural extension of Drawing I. Having learned the basic skills of drawing, students are given the opportunity to further express their ideas and feelings and to develop their own themes. Students have the opportunity to produce artwork on a range of surfaces using a variety of drawing media including graphite, charcoal, ink, pastels, watercolor and mixed media. Drawing II is designed to deepen experience, develop self-confidence, instill understanding, and encourage growth in artistic capability in the art student.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: Drawing I. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Life Drawing

In Life Drawing, students learn basic drawing skills and are encouraged to develop a personal style. Students of all skill levels have the opportunity to produce works of art based on the human form, using a variety of drawing media including graphite, charcoal, pen and ink, pastels, watercolor and acrylic paint on a variety of surfaces. The wide range of artistic abilities and interests among students is accommodated through individualized attention, critique and discussion. Guidance is given to those students wishing to strengthen their art portfolio with drawings of the human form.

This course allows students to draw from live nude models. This is a privilege in the Academy and provides excellent drawing opportunities for the serious and mature student.

Open to Grades 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: Drawing I recommended but not required. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. This course may be repeated for credit. Lab fee.

Painting I

Painting I is an introductory course which teaches basic painting skills and includes the study of value, color, space and texture. Through the experience of several paintings, students become familiar with these elements and explore their relationships. Students learn to stretch and prepare canvas, in addition to being introduced to a variety of painting surfaces.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Painting II

Painting II is a natural extension of Painting I. Students are introduced to the traditional method of painting that uses oil paint and various mediums. Having learned the basic skills of painting, students apply techniques and processes with more confidence and intent. Connections between historical, contemporary, and the students’ paintings are discussed. Painting II is designed to deepen experience, develop self-confidence, instill understanding and encourage growth in the artistic capabilities of the art student.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: Painting I. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Printmaking

Printmaking is a 21st century studio art course. It blends art skills, including drawing and design, with history, theory and studio practice of printmaking. Drawing is an essential, learnable tool for artists and one that students can practice to gain confidence and proficiency. This course explores drawing and mark-making through various printmaking media, with an emphasis on newly developed and environmentally friendly working methods.

Students have the opportunity to create the print matrix and make original print editions using: stencil methods; photo-based processes, such as intaglio-type and solarplate; mono-type; mezzotint; drypoint; engraving; and digital printmaking.

The course deepens students’ understanding of visual art through studio experimentation, immersion in popular visual/contemporary culture, analysis of art and development of personal vision. Films, museum and gallery visits, slide discussions and study of contemporary texts complement the studio instruction.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Black and White Film Photography

Black and White Film Photography serves as a comprehensive technical primer on black and white still photography using film. Through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques and lab activities, students master basic skills which include operation and maintenance of a camera system, darkroom procedures, negative archiving and photo retouching.

Students are assigned six assignments in which film is exposed, developed, proofed and printed. Each student needs a manual exposure control camera (i.e. 35mm SLR) or the ability to override automatic exposure of the shutter speed and aperture. New cameras start at $250 and used ones (in good condition) from $100 and up. Students can buy and sell their cameras at the beginning of the semester online, at local camera stores or from each other. The photo teacher (Alex Selarque, aselarque@punahou.edu) will help to facilitate communication if students need a camera or want to sell theirs.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Color Digital Photography

Color Digital Photography serves as a comprehensive technical primer on color still photography using modern digital technology. Through lectures, demonstrations, discussions, critiques and lab activities, students master basic skills which include operation and maintenance of a camera system, computer import and export procedures, digital archiving and photo retouching using Adobe Bridge and Photoshop.

Students are given six assignments in which a digital photograph is taken, imported, organized, proofed, enhanced, printed on inkjet and dye sublimation printers, and then saved to disk. Each student needs a manual exposure control camera (i.e. D-SLR) or the ability to manually adjust the shutter speed and aperture.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Photography II

Photography II utilizes the student’s technical knowledge to apply an understanding of processes for narrative and aesthetic outcomes. Assignments focus on mastering black and white and color techniques while synthesizing composition and culture in authentic photography as well as manipulated visual images. All work is printed as 16” x 20” enlargements with the intent to exhibit in the annual Kirsch Gallery show.

Students may choose to either shoot film or RAW digital files. Film students produce black and white in the darkroom and color assignments by scanning processed film, importing it into Adobe® Bridge and then working with Photoshop before printing to a large format inkjet color printer. Digital students will work entirely with digital media. An optional field trip opportunity off-island is typically offered once a year. Each student needs either a film or digital camera.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: One of the following: Black and White Film Photography or Color Digital Photography. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Digital Art

Digital Art offers a unique approach to understanding basic visual language. Computer applications and tools allow students to explore new ways of conceiving and constructing works of art. At the same time, the course provides a deeper understanding of art and its basic principles through assignments designed to integrate with and build upon foundation art skills, especially drawing and design.

The course teaches fundamentals of technology-based art, including basics of digital photography, digital drawing with a Wacom tablet, iPad, C.A.D., 3-D printing and animation. Students engage in manipulation and creation of digital imagery using computer software including: Photoshop, Flash, SketchUp and various creative apps. Digital Art is designed to expand understanding of visual art through technology, historical and cultural context, and formal art analysis and critique.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Digital Video

Digital Video combines cinema/television literacy with artistic production. Culture and art are examined through assignments which emphasize elements such as framing, perspective, movement, audio and editing while using conventions of documentaries, short narratives and experimental visual essays to communicate ideas.

The initial quarter, students learn to independently use video camcorders, record sound, and edit with a non-linear video computer application.

The following quarter, students work collaboratively in assigned and self- assigned teams on projects that challenge their creative, social, technical and management skills. Students learn to synthesize linear processes, such as script writing, scheduling and edit lists, with non-linear editing tools. Videos are screened and critiques involve discussions around pretext, subtext and context. Student videos will be exhibited in an annual Kirsch Gallery show. Each student needs a video camcorder or D-SLR with video recording capability. A tripod is preferred, but optional.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. No lab fee.

Introduction to Ceramics: Handbuilding

This course focuses on handbuilding as a process of making ideas come to life. With a certain amount of relaxed concentration and serious play, students experiment with four major techniques: pinch, coil, slab, and sculpture-in-the-round. In addition, tooling, finishing, glazing and firing are experienced. Students come to a deeper understanding of their creative process by focusing on their physical work with clay. There is ample opportunity for individual expression within and beyond the requirements.

Each student must keep a sketchbook. Students will be writing and sketching, which may be subjective, reflective and descriptive. Historical and cultural perspectives are introduced and may require research, group discussion, written observation, peer review and evaluation.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Introduction to Ceramics: Wheel Throwing I

This course concentrates on wheel throwing as a discipline to align the mind, body and the material. The methods described, demonstrated and taught are a combination of Western and Eastern traditions in pottery. In addition, modern and popular expansions are presented. The aim of this course is to give students an introduction to the techniques of wheel work in the context of a holistic environment, where body-mind integration, awareness and full participation are essential. There is ample opportunity for individual expression within and beyond the requirements.

Together with “throwing,” which means “turning” of a completely symmetrical pot from a lump of clay on the wheel, there are also tooling, finishing, glazing and firing techniques to be learned. Each student must keep a sketchbook/journal in which he/she develops reflections, along with drawings of other ceramic works and class notes. Students also explore historical
and contemporary ceramic art.

Open to Grades 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Ceramics: Wheel Throwing II

Advanced wheel throwing continues the challenge of expression through sculptural as well as functional forms. Centering takes on additional significance as the student seeks to find the center of the aesthetic gesture, trimming away all that is not needed to find the essence of craft brought to art form.

In this contract course each student uses the wheel and handbuilding methods to complete several major assignments, including a sculpture piece, a lidded jar, a teapot and a student-designed work. A sketchbook of designs, forms, glaze and chemical notes and aesthetic and historical reflections will be a part of the class.

Open to Grades 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: Wheel Throwing I. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Glass Blowing I

The course teaches students to form hot glass by off-hand blowing techniques. Students study a variety of shapes and proportions and apply them to functional, decorative and expressive forms. Color, optic molds, surface applications, grinding, polishing and sand blasting are presented as modifications of basic forms. Students focus on craftsmanship and purposeful control, while being encouraged to personalize their work.

The course consists of two lectures and three hours of lab per cycle with the option to use open lab time for additional hot and cold glass work. Grading is based on mastery of basic forming techniques in hot glass and on additional credits earned through optional work, design, research and critiques of studio glass. Keeping a notebook is required.

Open to Grades 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Glass Blowing II

In this course, students use glass as a creative medium. Advanced techniques in glass forming and decorating are presented and practiced as students prepare personally expressive pieces of glass.

Students explore the expressive possibilities of glass through practice assignments and then create presentation groups based on design elements and function. They are expected to keep a journal and to complete critical studies of studio glass.

Open to Grade 11, 12. Prerequisite: Glass Blowing I and consent of instructor. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Metals-Jewelry I

Metals-Jewelry I is an introduction to the techniques of design and metalsmithing essential to making small-scale sculpture and jewelry. Students develop skills through exploration of traditional and emergent digital processes. Traditional use of the jeweler’s saw, soldering, polishing, simple forming, wax work, mold making and bronze casting are complemented through a series of digital explorations in 3D scanning, modeling and printing. The evidence of the process consists of finished pieces using silver, bronze, brass, copper, cardboard and ABS plastic.

The course emphasizes development of a personal aesthetic through design as well as mastery of techniques and a sense of excellence in craft. Visual research and drawings are required in the process of developing each assignment. A sketchbook is required.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Metals-Jewelry II

Building on techniques from Metals-Jewelry I, students continue to develop a personal aesthetic at a small scale. Advanced design and metal forming techniques are explored as well as attention to research related to historical and contemporary design, sculpture and jewelry. Individual choices in technical and conceptual areas to pursue lead to an emerging personal aesthetic for students.

Students choose to create projects using bronze, brass, copper, cardboard, ABS plastic and other related materials. They develop working plans for each major assignment based on self-directed criteria. A sketchbook is required.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. Prerequisite: Metals-Jewelry I. Semester course (spring semester only). One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Sculpture

Students are asked to think, design and create in three-dimensional space. Design and composition of three-dimensional objects are explored. Students work with concepts of construction and expression as they explore the qualities of line, space, texture and form using a variety of techniques and ideas. They experience a range of materials including, but not limited to, clay, plaster, fiber and found objects.

The study of sculptors throughout history, including a focus on contemporary artists, is an important aspect of this class, helping to inspire and inform the decisions that students make in their own work.

There is ample opportunity for individual expression within and beyond the requirements. Each student must keep a sketchbook. Students will be writing and sketching, which may be subjective, reflective and descriptive. Historical and cultural perspectives are introduced and may require research, group discussion, written observation, peer review, and evaluation.

Open to Grades 9, 10, 11, 12. No prerequisite. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Studio Art

Studio Art is a non-media specific art course focusing on strengthening the creative process and defining the creator’s unique and original voice. Catering to a diverse group of students working in 2D, 3D and 4D, with varying levels of art-making experience, this class’ core unifying principle is the concept of what it means to be creative and how to create meaningful work. Students are encouraged to experiment and explore ideas through a variety of media to develop skills to go from being a rule-taker to a rule-maker. The course structure is centered around the individual student exploring ideas with the teacher as a facilitator. Classtime is devoted to discussions on creative strategies, what to do when you don’t know what to do, critiques, field trips and visiting artists. The teacher aids the student in finding strategies of art-making that match the student’s learning style. Students end the semester with the presentation of a portfolio of images of the work done for this class. All students are welcome: both students who have a focus in mind as well as those seeking to find a focus in their work.

Open to Grades 10, 11, 12. Prerequisites: At least two studio art classes. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Advanced Placement Art Studio

Students who are serious about preparing a body of artwork for an Advanced Placement Committee and for college admission presentations will find this course useful. Students will expand and explore their understanding of the world of Art. Three areas of emphasis for the portfolios are developed during the year course: quality of work, concentration of work and breadth of work. By examining their own thought processes and developing their own ideas, students create works for a visual portfolio. They explore a variety of art media to challenge and define themselves as artists.

Open to Grades 11, 12. Prerequisites: At least two studio art classes. Year course. One credit. Advanced Placement courses must be taken for a letter grade. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Arts & Letters (Visual Arts (ID))

This course assumes that every human being is creative and that development of imagination is good for the soul. As students walk through the doors of the Arts and Letters classrooms, they become poets, writers and artists. Meeting with both an English teacher and an Art teacher, students study art as viewers and creators, with an emphasis on how art springs from experience and how experience is altered by art. The art section of the course focuses on a variety of media including artists’ books and printmaking. Professional artists and writers provide examples for inspiration and analysis. We will examine art in local museums and galleries and seek to understand the function of art and literature in our school community.

Open to Grades 11, 12. Prerequisite: English 2. Semester course. One credit (one-half English, one- half Art). Satisfies English and Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirements and Spiritual, Ethical, Community Responsibility graduation requirement or general elective credit. Lab fee.

Independent Art Studio

Independent Art Studio is an advanced course of self-directed studio work that may be taken with the permission of a sponsoring teacher. The media availability is limited so students must confer with, and receive permission from a sponsoring teacher, before signing up for this course. A contract for the course is developed by the student, and approved by the teacher and Department Head prior to the beginning of the semester. This course is appropriate only to those few independent students whose projects do not fit in the Studio Art course.

Open to Grades 11, 12. Prerequisites: All level I and II courses available in the medium to be studied, and permission of the sponsoring teacher. Each Art Department teacher may accept no more than four Independent Art Studio students in one semester. Semester course. One-half credit. Satisfies Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement if taken for a grade or general elective credit if Credit/No Credit. Lab fee.